Johannes Thiel (about) is an artist and designer working in different kinds of media, including renderings, graphicdesign, videos and sound. He is currently studying visual communication at the university of arts in berlin. For enquiries, questions or collaborative projects, feel free to (contact) me!
@johannesthl





Johannes Thiel (about) is an artist and designer working in different kinds of media, including renderings, graphicdesign, videos and music. He is currently studying visual communication at the university of arts in berlin. For enquiries, questions or collaborative projects, feel free to (contact) me!
@johannesthl













FORMUNG
2022
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“Oh, ich hab dir gar nicht zugehört!”
2022
Collaborative works 
Exhibition at Plast in Leipzig









Photos: Luka Naujoks

“Eine gravierte Fahrradbremsscheibe dreht sich mit zuckenden Bewegungen auf einem organisch und doch technoid wirkenden Untergrund. Was wie kinetische Kunst oder Readymade platziert auf einer Art außerirdischem Beckenknochen erscheint, ist tatsächlich Produkt eines langwierigen, multimedialen Erarbeitungs- und Selektionsprozesses.

Ein junges Berliner Kollektiv zeigt in Leipzig die Ergebnisse seiner kooperativen Arbeitsweisen. Im Vordergrund steht dabei das interdisziplinäre Schaffen, die gewollte gegenseitige Beeinflussung der drei Künstlerinnen und Künstler sowohl im gemeinsamen Produzieren als auch gegenseitigen Kuratieren. Mit dem Ziel, möglichst viel Intuition und Fluidität in den gemeinsamen kreativen Prozess zu bringen. Die dabei entstandenen skulpturalen Objekte wirken surreal, fast düster und doch auf eine besondere Art anziehend – sie scheinen in einer unwirklichen Blase zwischen kreatürlich wirkender Anatomie und mechanischer Fragilität zu schweben.” (Monopol, 18.03.22)
Text: Robin Ahrens
















Photos: Luka Naujoks

Poster: Marlon Nicolaisen, Johannes Thiel







C7950ZN
Johannes Thiel, Marlon Nicolaisen
2022

Kinetic sculpture / installation with monitor mounts, metal pipe, 3d prints, vacuum bag, air pump, metal hose, sand, printed aluminum plate, metal rods

           C7950ZN is a kinetic sculpture in a space-filling installation. The installation shows a scene of an excavation, uncovering a creature from the surrounding sand, an observation of the found objects, a measurement of individual fragments and the site itself on the aluminum plate. An insect-like skeleton consisting of monitor mounts and 3D printed parts extends over two meters hanging from the ceiling. In a steady cycle, the lungs of the otherwise lifeless object fill with air and collapse again and again shortly after. The installations title  is based on the naming of asteroids observed by people on Earth, with each letter and number defining a specification of the flying object, as well as the time of observation.


The installation was first shown at the CTM Vorpsiel in Silent Green.



sin(x) 24:00
2021
4-channel audio installation, HD video, contact loudspeaker, loudspeaker chassis, aluminium plate, cavity plate, stands, metal spring, wire cable, monitor

            Over the course of 24 minutes, sin(x) (24:00) creates organic soundscapes that merge into one another. The nature of the four different loudspeaker constructions have an influence on the sound of the audio signals, depending on the material and shape. All sounds were heard in the installation were created using FM synthesis, which is based on the frequency modulation of several sine tones among each other. In this way, simple tones as well as more complex noises can be generated. Many parameters are randomised, the more chaotic, the more natural the sounds. The sound design moves on the borderline from organic, calming moments to obviously synthesised, digital sounds. sin(x) (24:00) raises the question of the extent to which a system can be behind nature or whether this system only has to be random enough for us to perceive it as natural. Depending on the number of minutes in the installation, which represent hours of a day, the monitor displays the sun’s position in the form of a white surface. When one "day" is over, the next begins again in a slightly different form.